Desert vs Dessert | My Memory tricks

Hello everyone!

Today we are back with a few of my tips on how to memorise desert and dessert. They are similar yet have a different spelling and pronunciation.

Watch the video first to make sure you never confuse them again. Then download the worksheet and expand your vocabulary.

1. Watch this video

2. Check out the activity sheet

FREE download here! confusing words

And cherry on the cake, it is an interactive pdf! You don’t even need to print it. You are welcome ūüėČ

confusing words

That’s it for today guys. I really hope you enjoyed the lesson. Let me know what words you struggle to memorise in the comment section down below!

Keep on learning! Xoxo

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If you want to help me create more content more regularly, please consider helping me with just a coffee. Ko-fi is a website that gives you the possibility to power me with lots of energy by offering me a coffee. It’s easy, simple, no engagement is required…Just a bit of help, love and support from you to me.

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It’s a dog’s life! (A2-B1)

Hello dear students!

I am back on the blog after a little while with a lesson on dogs! It is a vlog (video blog) with loads of vocabulary and the activity sheet that goes with it!

In this lesson you will learn some basic dog anatomy, some verbs you can use and a bit more general vocabulary on man’s best friend.

1. Watch this video

 

2. Check out the activity sheet

FREE download here! Dog vocabulary

 

Dog vocabulary

That’s it for today guys. I really hope you enjoyed the lesson. Keep on learning! Xoxo

And don’t forget to follow My Little English Page on¬†Facebook¬†,¬†Instagram¬†and YouTube¬†for regular updates.

 


If you want to help me create more content more regularly, please consider helping me with just a coffee. Ko-fi is a website that gives you the possibility to power me with lots of energy by offering me a coffee. It’s easy, simple, no engagement is required…Just a bit of help, love and support from you to me.

Here is the link to my ko-fi account: Ko-fi My little English Page

Trinity ISE II Interactive Prompts

ise ii prompts

Hello English world!

I am back with some prompts for the Trinity examination ISE II. The last time I published materials for ISE II was more than over a year ago with the ISE II Conversation Phase Activity which was (and still is) my most popular post.

This time, I am giving you 10 prompts that you can use with your students to practice the interactive phase of the ISE II examination! Yay! Exciting!

In case you are not familiar with this activity, the examiner and the candidate role play a scenario. The candidate is the one in charge of keeping the conversation going. To do so, he/she has to ask as many questions as possible, assess the situation and try to give advice or a solution.

Let’s not waste time and get down to it!

Prompt 1

Your teacher has asked you to interview people with original hobbies. You friend’s sister is the perfect candidate. However she is very shy. Try to convince your friend to introduce you to her.

Prompt 2

Your friend has just lost her work phone but was expecting an extremely important phone call from a client. She doesn’t know what to do.

Prompt 3

You take your friend to the airport to get a flight home for Christmas but due to traffic they miss their plane. Help them find a solution.

Prompt 4

Your friend at university is having a change of heart regarding their study choice. She is considering dropping everything and having a go at a career in writing. She asks for advice.

Prompt 5

Your friend tells you that their partner is angry at them. They don’t know why nor what to do.

Prompt 6

Your friend’s sister is getting married this weekend. They have to write a speech but are terrified of speaking in public.

Prompt 7

Your friend wants to buy a new car but his wife prefers a different model.

Prompt 8

Your friend has been offered two jobs. One is boring and well paid, the other one is interesting yet badly paid.

Prompt 9

Your friend has been invited to a party by her mother-in-law but they don’t get along very well. She is not sure what to do.

Prompt 10

Your colleague has an important presentation in 30 minutes but has just spilled coffee all over their shirt.

I also recommend that you give your students prompts they can relate to. One easy way to do so, is to ask your students to actually make the prompts themselves. They can use their own experience to create the problems, which will make it easier when it comes to finding solutions to the problems and giving advice.

I hope you appreciate the prompts and feel free to write some more in the comment section!

That’s it for today guys…Keep on learning! Xoxo

And don’t forget to follow My Little English Page on¬†Facebook¬†,¬†Instagram¬†and YouTube¬†for regular updates.

 


If you want to help me create more content more regularly, please consider helping me with just a coffee. Ko-fi is a website that gives you the possibility to power me with lots of energy by offering me a coffee. It’s easy, simple, no engagement is required…Just a bit of help, love and support from you to me.

Here is the link to my ko-fi account: Ko-fi My little English Page

Idiom in Z | Zip it

 

Snapshot 1

Hello dear students and welcome back!

Today is the last day of our Alphabet idiom series. Make sure you check the previous idiom¬†Idiom in Y ‚Äď Yellow Press¬†(and the 25 other posts).

So today we cover just a few idioms that start with the letter Z. There aren’t many in English but they are quite cool and useful. Are you ready for a new vocabulary lesson? Let’s go!

What it means:

It means to be quiet, silent. It is colloquial and could be rude in certain situations.

When to use it:

As I mentioned before, this expression is colloquial so I would not recommend using it with someone of authority. You could perhaps use it with a good friend or a family member.

It is often used as an order and the longer version is “Zip your lip”.

Example: Martha is complaining about eating spinach for dinner? Well tell her to zip and ¬†eat whatever¬†I’ve¬†made, otherwise she can make dinner for the family herself.

 Other interesting idioms:

zenith of your career/life –¬†the highest point of a person‚Äôs career or life.

zoom away | zoom off –¬†to be in a hurry,¬†to drive away fast,¬†to be leaving a place in a rush.

I’d love to start a new series for the blog soon, have you got any requests or suggestions?

 


 

If you want to help me create more content more regularly, please consider helping me with just a coffee. Ko-fi is a website that gives you the possibility to power me with lots of energy by offering me a coffee. It’s easy, simple, no engagement is required…Just a bit of help, love and support from you to me.

Here is the link to my ko-fi account: Ko-fi My little English Page

Thanks for everything and of course…Keep on learning!

XOxo

And don’t forget to follow My Little English Page on¬†Facebook¬†,¬†Instagram¬†and YouTube¬†for regular updates.

Idiom in Y – Yellow Press

Snapshot_504

Hello dear students and welcome back to My Little English Page. It’s been a while but I am back to finish the series…One more to go! This week I posted a series of slides with yellow expressions on Instagram and Facebook. So let’s follow on the colour yellow with the letter Y of the alphabet series.

Make sure to check the previous post in the alphabet series Idiom in X | X Marks the Spot

What it means:

The yellow press is a term for the popular and sensationalist newspapers. This type of newspaper uses big catchy titles and misleading information (often not accurate).

When to use it:

  • Yellow journalism/press is an American term so it’s probably best to use it in the US.

Example: I can’t believe you read that kind of newspaper. It’s all over exaggerated and full of lies. I really can’t stand the yellow press.

  • In the UK, the term red tops is much more commonly used (British Tabloids usually have a red title…that’s where the name comes from).

Example: What are you doing reading that red top? Don’t you know it’s full of crap?

Other interesting idioms:

Yesterday’s news – Someone or something that is yesterday’s news is something people already know about, no longer interesting.

You can choose your friends, but you can’t choose your family – Some things you can choose, but others you cannot, so you make the best of what you have. It is often used to talk about people who don’t have a good relationship with their family.

You can’t unring a bell – This means that once something has been done, that’s how it is and you can’t change it. So, you have to live with the consequences.

You get what you pay for – When you get something really cheap you cannot complain about the low quality.

Your call РIf something is your call, you make a decision.

 


 

Keep on learning!

And don’t forget to follow My Little English Page on¬†Facebook¬†,¬†Instagram¬†and YouTube¬†for regular updates.

Idiom in X | X Marks the Spot

Snapshot_503.png

So…As it seems, there aren’t many idioms that start with the letter X. I have only found 3 for this week¬īs idiom.

Don’t forget to check out last week¬īs¬†Idiom in W ‚Äď Water Under the Bridge

What it means:

It refers to the exact spot. Imagine a map on which someone has indicated a location with a cross, well X marks the spot!

When to use it:

  • When you point at something, whatever it is marks the spot.
  • If you see any type of landmark or use something you see as a way to indicate direction you can say also use that expression. Ex: Can you see that church on the hill over there? Well, X marks the spot!

Other interesting idioms:

X-factor – If someone has the X-factor they have an outstanding ability, or an ability that is so impressive that you ignore they bad qualities. The talent show (also called X-factor) was named that way in relation to the candidates¬īunique abilities.

X-rated –¬†If something is x-rated, it is not suitable for children. Usually associated with sexual content.

 


 

Like I said guys, there aren’t many idioms in X that exist. Next week, we will cover more idioms…promise!

Keep on learning!

And don’t forget to follow My Little English Page on¬†Facebook¬†,¬†Instagram¬†and YouTube¬†for regular updates.

Idiom in W – Water Under the Bridge

I am a bit late for this entry…My apologies! I have been extremely busy. For instance I started doing live videos on YouTube last Friday! It was quite fun and interactive. Here is the link in case you want to check it out!

 

Anyways…Are you ready for our weekly idiom?

What it means:

If something is water under the bridge it belongs to the past, is unimportant or not a problem anymore.

When to use it:

  • It is often used when someone has wronged you such a long time ago that it does not matter anymore.
  • Something could also be water under the bridge because you have forgiven the person.

Other interesting idioms:

Wake up and smell the coffee – When someone doesn’t realise what is really happening or is not paying attention to what is going on, you can tell them to wake up and smell the coffee.

Walk on eggshells – If you have to walk on eggshells with someone, you have to be very careful as they get angry or offended easily.

Well-oiled machine – Something that functions very well is a well-oiled machine. It does not necessarily refer to machines. A team of workers who work well together can be refered to as a well-oiled machine.

Whale of a time РIf you have a whale of a time, you really have a good time.

 

 

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Idiom in T – Think Outside the Box

What it means:

If you think outside the box, you think in an imaginative and creative way.

How to use it:

People tend to use this idiom as a way to encourage others to be creative. It does not only refer to arts and crafts but anything that might be done in a non conventional way.

  • People who live in extremely small apartments have to think outside the box to make a comfortable living space.
  • You could be trying to solve a riddle and someone tells you to think outside the box. This means do not do what seems obvious, think further.

Other interesting idioms:

Take a nosedive – When things take a nosedive, they decline very quickly and head towards disaster.

Take by storm – To take by storm means to captivate- eg. A new play that took New York City by storm.

The ball’s in your court – If somebody says this to you, they mean that it’s up to you to decide or take the next step.

The grass is always greener – This idiom means that what other people have or do looks preferable to our life. The complete phrase is ‘The grass is always greener on the other side of the fence’.

 

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Idiom in S – Safety in Numbers

Welcome to 2018 first blog post! Christmas and New Year’s Eve are long gone and have left me with quite a few extra kilos on my hips…How bad is it for you?

Let’s tackle our weekly idiom!

What it means:

If a lot of people do something risky at the same time, the risk is reduced because there is safety in numbers.

When to use it:

Let’s have a look at some examples of when this idiom could be used.

  • It is commonly used with animals. Gazelles stay in packs as a defense mechanism against predators. Lions are less likely to attack an animal in a group, than one which is isolated. The groups can also come to the rescue of the lone animal. Safety in numbers…
  • Your parents probably used this idiom very often when you were a teenager. It still applies no matter what your age is though. When you go out, you should never have to walk alone outside in the street. Having someone, or even better a group, with you is the best protection as people are more likely to be intimidated and leave you alone.

Other interesting idioms:

Scaredy-cat РIt is a person who gets scared easily by very little.

Safe and sound – If you are safe and sound, then nothing has harmed you.

Salt in a wound – If you rub salt in a wound, you make someone feel bad about something that is already a painful experience. (similar to add insult to injury)

Same old, same old – It means that something is the same, it does not change.

 

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