Pronunciation Marathon

Hello dear students! Today is the official start of the pronunciation marathon! It is a while week during which I will post a video every day. Each video will include a pronunciation tip and a tongue twister.

I have created a document with more tongue twisters in case you master the ones I give in the videos too quickly.

You can download it for FREE

>>>>>>> Tongue Twisters <<<<<<<<

Tongue Twisters

 

Here is DAY 1! (Don’t miss any of the pronunciation marathon videos and subscribe to the channel)

 

So, did you like the first tip of the marathon? Let me know in the comment section below.

Keep on learning! Xoxo

And don’t forget to follow My Little English Page on Facebook , Instagram and YouTube for regular updates.

 


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Idiom in Y – Yellow Press

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Hello dear students and welcome back to My Little English Page. It’s been a while but I am back to finish the series…One more to go! This week I posted a series of slides with yellow expressions on Instagram and Facebook. So let’s follow on the colour yellow with the letter Y of the alphabet series.

Make sure to check the previous post in the alphabet series Idiom in X | X Marks the Spot

What it means:

The yellow press is a term for the popular and sensationalist newspapers. This type of newspaper uses big catchy titles and misleading information (often not accurate).

When to use it:

  • Yellow journalism/press is an American term so it’s probably best to use it in the US.

Example: I can’t believe you read that kind of newspaper. It’s all over exaggerated and full of lies. I really can’t stand the yellow press.

  • In the UK, the term red tops is much more commonly used (British Tabloids usually have a red title…that’s where the name comes from).

Example: What are you doing reading that red top? Don’t you know it’s full of crap?

Other interesting idioms:

Yesterday’s news – Someone or something that is yesterday’s news is something people already know about, no longer interesting.

You can choose your friends, but you can’t choose your family – Some things you can choose, but others you cannot, so you make the best of what you have. It is often used to talk about people who don’t have a good relationship with their family.

You can’t unring a bell – This means that once something has been done, that’s how it is and you can’t change it. So, you have to live with the consequences.

You get what you pay for – When you get something really cheap you cannot complain about the low quality.

Your call – If something is your call, you make a decision.

 


 

Keep on learning!

And don’t forget to follow My Little English Page on Facebook , Instagram and YouTube for regular updates.

Idiom in Q – Quiet as a Mouse

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We are so close to Christmas! Are you excited?

Tomorrow night, if you are as quiet as a mouse you might be able to hear the bells on Santa’s sledge.

What it means:

If somebody is as quiet as a mouse they make as little noise as possible.

When to use it:

  • In any situation when someone is trying to be unnoticeable. The person often acts a lot more quietly as well, avoiding rapid movement and sometimes remaining still.
  • It could be someone trying to hide to surprise a friend, a child trying to be forgoten after bringing home bad grades or even a shy person being very quiet.

Other interesting idioms:

Question of time – If something’s a question of time, it’s definitely going to happen but you just don’t know when.

Quick fix – A quick fix is an easy (usually temporary)  solution.

Quiet before the Storm – It is when you know that something is about to go horribly wrong, but hasn’t just yet.

 

Keep on learning!

Xoxo

 

And don’t forget to follow My Little English Page on Facebook , Instagram and YouTube for regular updates.

Idiom in P – Page-Turner

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Another week, another idiom. We tackle number 16 of our weekly post. Last time it was letter O so we covered ‘Off the Grid’ so make sure to check it out if you haven’t already.

What it means:

A very exciting book.

How to use it:

  • It is used to describe a book that is so interesting that you cannot stop reading page after page.

Example: The name of the wind is my favourite book. It is such a page-turner.

Other interesting idioms:

Packed like Sardines – If a place if very crowded you can say that you are packed like sardines (ex: We went to the club like night but left very quickly. We were packed like sardines so it was very unpleasant).

Pay on the nail – It means to pay quickly and it cash (ex: I don’t mind lending Jack money. He always pays it back on the nail).

Penny pincher – A penny pincher is either a mean person or someone who really doesn’t like to spend money (ex: She always goes for cheap products…even when the quality is bad. She is a reall penny pincher).

Pep talk – It is a conversation usually given to motivate or boos someone’s confidence (ex: When I was a teenager, my dance teacher used to give us a pep talk before every show. It always motivated us to do our best).

 

Keep on learning!

Xoxo

 

And don’t forget to follow My Little English Page on Facebook , Instagram and YouTube for regular updates.

Idiom in O – Off the Grid

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The 15th idiom of the series! Have you ever heard of this one? Well, sometimes it is good to get off the grid for a while.

What it means:

To make it simple it means “not connected”.

How to use it:

It can be used in many different ways. Here are just a few:

  • Not connected to social media or internet.

I tried contacting Pepe via Whatsapp but I just remembered that he is on a retreat so he will be off the grid for a while.

  • Not connected to services (water, electricity…):

Once our solar panels generate enough power, we’ll be able to go off the grid.

  • Not under governmental control:

The inventor of the Bitcoin currency is still unknown to this date. He is completely off the grid.

Other interesting idioms:

On a roll – If someone is on a roll they are experiencing good luck and success (ex: So, you found a ten pound note on the floor this morning and your boss gave you a day off? You’d better play the lottery today because you are on a roll).

On board – To be on board means that you are willing to do something (ex: I asked Mark if he wanted to come with us to Madrid this weekend and he said that he was on board).

Open book – If a person is an open book they are easy to understand and to know (ex: I know you like that boy, it is obvious. You are like an open book).

Open secret – Something that is supposed to be a secret but that everyone knows (ex: Marilyn Monroe and John Kennedy had a relationship. It was an open secret).

 

Keep on learning!

Xoxo

 

And don’t forget to follow My Little English Page on Facebook , Instagram and YouTube for regular updates.

B2 Listening – Plastic Surgery

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And here we go with another Trinity style listening exercise. This one is for ISE II (B2) students, but feel free to challenge yourself with this exercise regardless of your level (as the listening is a bit long and on the higher spectrum of B2).

I chose the topic of plastic surgery specifically because it is a controversial topic. Which means the exercise is more focused on expressing ideas and opinion than fishing for pure facts like in the previous one (B1 Listening – Axolotls)

  • Audio clip:

 

  • Download this document for the script, the questions and the answers.

Plastic Surgery B2

You need to get 50% of the answers right. Let me know how it went in a comment below!

Keep on learning!

Xoxo

 

And don’t forget to follow My Little English Page on Facebook , Instagram and YouTube for regular updates.

5 (other) Great ESL Activities

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Since you all seemed to enjoy 10 Great Speaking Activities I decided to write another similar post. I hope you find this one as useful as the previous one and that your students have fun with the activities.

  • Fun Scattegories

This is more like a mix of scattegories and list 5 things. Divide your class into pairs or small groups. Write one of these on the board:

-things to say while breaking up

-things you say to avoid meeting your mother-in-law

-things racist people say to show they are not racist

-excuses for not having your homework

-things to say to get out of a parking ticket

Then tell your students to write 5 options. Warn them to be original as they will only get 1 point if another team has the same options, but 2 points if nobody has the same.

This is a nice, quick and easy activity that students usually really like.

 

  • The Forced opinion game

Randomly choose half of the class to be the agree side and the other half for disagree. Have them seat according to the opinion you have assigned them. It could be a good idea to tell your students that you are of course aware that whatever they will say during the game is not their real opinion. Then write one of the following on the board (feel free to add your own, the more controversial the better):

-Women should stay at home (If your male students are very shy I suggest making sure they are are on the disagree team for this one)

-Holy Week should be banned (this one works magic here in Seville)

-Politicians should earn more money

-Real Betis is better than Sevilla

-Being famous…what a horrible life

As you can see some of those statements can be quite difficult to agree (or disagree with) so I suggest you give your students a few minutes to think of some aguments and then just let them debate. Make sure everybody participates!

 

  • The Speculation Game:

This is a nice activity to apply the use of modal verbs (possibility, certainty, impossibility, speculation…). Here are a few examples of photos you can use for this activity.

 

Pair your students up and have them tell you what happened in those photos. Make sure they use modal verbs (e.g. The monkeys must have been curious).

To extend this activity tell your students to actually write the story of how this happened. You will see how imaginative those students of yours can be.

 

  • The Wikipedia Race

This game might be better for more advanced students.

Tell your students to get their phones out (has to be a smart phone as you need internet). Tell your students to go on Wikipedia. Look for random articles (it is an option on wikipedia) and choose 2. New tell your students to all go to the same one on their phones. The more similar the two articles the easier is will be so don’t hesitate to use your teacher veto on some of the articles suggested.

The goal is to get to the other article by only clicking on the links provided by Wikipedia. It is a really good exercise to practice reading fact and scanning for information (which is something students need to do for their exams).

  • The 5-second rule game

This is one of my new favourite games.

Give your students 5-6 little papers each. Tell them to write things to list on each paper ( ex: types of soups, words starting by the lette -e-, blue objects, things you cannot buy at the supermarket…) and then gather the papers.

Now one student will take a paper and has 5 seconds to list 3 of what is asked on the paper (or more depending on how advanced your students are). If the student doesn’t manage to list what he was supposed to, the person on the left gets 5 seconds as well. BUT none of the words mentioned by the previous student can be used. Continue until one of the students manages to do it (he gets the point). If none of them manages to do it, the first student gets the point. Then another student gets a paper and the game continues until the teacher says so (or maybe the end of the class).

It is actually a real game that you can buy in shops. If you decide to buy it, instead of making it as I suggest it, keep in mind that you will have to go through the cards first (some cards require pretty advanced vocabulary or a fairly advanced knowledge of British culture). It does come with a 5 second timer and this is very convenient.

 

Let me know how these activities went and which one your students preferred! Have fun and of course…

Keep on teaching!

XOxo

 

And don’t forget to follow My Little English Page on Facebook , Instagram and YouTube for regular updates.

 

 

Idiom in K – Keep at Bay

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And we continue this series of idioms with the letter -K-

What it means:

If you keep something, or someone, at bay it means that you are preventing them from coming too close, whether it is physically or metaphorically. (Also hold something at bay)

When to use it:

Let’s have a look at the physical aspect of it. If you keep someone at bay, you do what you can to keep them far from you. A typical example could be an overprotective dad keeping any of his daughter’s suitors at bay and scaring them (Who has a dad like that? Mine used to say that he would cut all my future boyfriends’ ears  and make them pointy like elves…Do not ask me why…You know, funny dads!)

But then I also mentioned a metaphorical aspect. By this, I am actually referring to abstract things such as sadness or hunger. I could for instance say that a nice cup of tea keeps the cold at bay in winter.

Other interesting idioms in K:

 Keep a straight face – To stay serious and not to laugh despite wanting to.

Kick a habit – Stop doing something (that you are used to doing)

Knight in shining armour – A person who saves you when you are in great trouble

 

Keep on learning!

Xoxo

 

And don’t forget to follow My Little English Page on Facebook , Instagram and YouTube for regular updates.

Idiom in J – Je ne sais quoi

 

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Yes, that’s French! A lot of French expressions are used in English actually!

What it means:

“Je ne sais quoi” means that something is good but for a reason that is difficult to explain.

When to use it:

Use it when you can’t quite say what is that little thing that makes it how it is. This expression will also make you sound a little fancy.

Imagine that both Gordon and you have each made a cake. You both followed the instructions correctly but for some reason Gordon’s is better. You could say that his cake has a je ne sais quoi.

Other Interesting Idioms in J:

Just what the doctor ordered – It means that it is just what you need.

Justice is blind – It means that justice is impartial.

 

Keep on learning!

Xoxo

 

And don’t forget to follow My Little English Page on Facebook and Instagram for regular updates.