Desert vs Dessert | My Memory tricks

Hello everyone!

Today we are back with a few of my tips on how to memorise desert and dessert. They are similar yet have a different spelling and pronunciation.

Watch the video first to make sure you never confuse them again. Then download the worksheet and expand your vocabulary.

1. Watch this video

2. Check out the activity sheet

FREE download here! confusing words

And cherry on the cake, it is an interactive pdf! You don’t even need to print it. You are welcome ūüėČ

confusing words

That’s it for today guys. I really hope you enjoyed the lesson. Let me know what words you struggle to memorise in the comment section down below!

Keep on learning! Xoxo

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Idiom in Y – Yellow Press

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Hello dear students and welcome back to My Little English Page. It’s been a while but I am back to finish the series…One more to go! This week I posted a series of slides with yellow expressions on Instagram and Facebook. So let’s follow on the colour yellow with the letter Y of the alphabet series.

Make sure to check the previous post in the alphabet series Idiom in X | X Marks the Spot

What it means:

The yellow press is a term for the popular and sensationalist newspapers. This type of newspaper uses big catchy titles and misleading information (often not accurate).

When to use it:

  • Yellow journalism/press is an American term so it’s probably best to use it in the US.

Example: I can’t believe you read that kind of newspaper. It’s all over exaggerated and full of lies. I really can’t stand the yellow press.

  • In the UK, the term red tops is much more commonly used (British Tabloids usually have a red title…that’s where the name comes from).

Example: What are you doing reading that red top? Don’t you know it’s full of crap?

Other interesting idioms:

Yesterday’s news – Someone or something that is yesterday’s news is something people already know about, no longer interesting.

You can choose your friends, but you can’t choose your family – Some things you can choose, but others you cannot, so you make the best of what you have. It is often used to talk about people who don’t have a good relationship with their family.

You can’t unring a bell – This means that once something has been done, that’s how it is and you can’t change it. So, you have to live with the consequences.

You get what you pay for – When you get something really cheap you cannot complain about the low quality.

Your call РIf something is your call, you make a decision.

 


 

Keep on learning!

And don’t forget to follow My Little English Page on¬†Facebook¬†,¬†Instagram¬†and YouTube¬†for regular updates.

Idiom in X | X Marks the Spot

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So…As it seems, there aren’t many idioms that start with the letter X. I have only found 3 for this week¬īs idiom.

Don’t forget to check out last week¬īs¬†Idiom in W ‚Äď Water Under the Bridge

What it means:

It refers to the exact spot. Imagine a map on which someone has indicated a location with a cross, well X marks the spot!

When to use it:

  • When you point at something, whatever it is marks the spot.
  • If you see any type of landmark or use something you see as a way to indicate direction you can say also use that expression. Ex: Can you see that church on the hill over there? Well, X marks the spot!

Other interesting idioms:

X-factor – If someone has the X-factor they have an outstanding ability, or an ability that is so impressive that you ignore they bad qualities. The talent show (also called X-factor) was named that way in relation to the candidates¬īunique abilities.

X-rated –¬†If something is x-rated, it is not suitable for children. Usually associated with sexual content.

 


 

Like I said guys, there aren’t many idioms in X that exist. Next week, we will cover more idioms…promise!

Keep on learning!

And don’t forget to follow My Little English Page on¬†Facebook¬†,¬†Instagram¬†and YouTube¬†for regular updates.

Idiom in S – Safety in Numbers

Welcome to 2018 first blog post! Christmas and New Year’s Eve are long gone and have left me with quite a few extra kilos on my hips…How bad is it for you?

Let’s tackle our weekly idiom!

What it means:

If a lot of people do something risky at the same time, the risk is reduced because there is safety in numbers.

When to use it:

Let’s have a look at some examples of when this idiom could be used.

  • It is commonly used with animals. Gazelles stay in packs as a defense mechanism against predators. Lions are less likely to attack an animal in a group, than one which is isolated. The groups can also come to the rescue of the lone animal. Safety in numbers…
  • Your parents probably used this idiom very often when you were a teenager. It still applies no matter what your age is though. When you go out, you should never have to walk alone outside in the street. Having someone, or even better a group, with you is the best protection as people are more likely to be intimidated and leave you alone.

Other interesting idioms:

Scaredy-cat РIt is a person who gets scared easily by very little.

Safe and sound – If you are safe and sound, then nothing has harmed you.

Salt in a wound – If you rub salt in a wound, you make someone feel bad about something that is already a painful experience. (similar to add insult to injury)

Same old, same old – It means that something is the same, it does not change.

 

And don’t forget to follow My Little English Page on¬†Facebook¬†,¬†Instagram¬†and YouTube¬†for regular updates.

Idiom in P – Page-Turner

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Another week, another idiom. We tackle number 16 of our weekly post. Last time it was letter O so we covered¬†‘Off the Grid’ so make sure to check it out if you haven’t already.

What it means:

A very exciting book.

How to use it:

  • It is used to describe a book that is so interesting that you cannot stop reading page after page.

Example: The name of the wind is my favourite book. It is such a page-turner.

Other interesting idioms:

Packed like Sardines – If a place if very crowded you can say that you are packed like sardines (ex: We went to the club like night but left very quickly. We were packed like sardines so it was very unpleasant).

Pay on the nail –¬†It means to pay quickly and it cash (ex: I don’t mind lending Jack money. He always pays it back on the nail).

Penny pincher –¬†A penny pincher is either a mean person or someone who really doesn’t like to spend money (ex: She always goes for cheap products…even when the quality is bad. She is a reall penny pincher).

Pep talk –¬†It is a conversation usually given to motivate or boos someone’s confidence (ex: When I was a teenager, my dance teacher used to give us a pep talk before every show. It always motivated us to do our best).

 

Keep on learning!

Xoxo

 

And don’t forget to follow My Little English Page on¬†Facebook¬†,¬†Instagram¬†and YouTube¬†for regular updates.

Idiom in M – Make Someone’s Day

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It’s official! I am committing to posting a new idiom for this series every week. So make sure to follow the blog and you’ll receive a notification as soon as it is out every week.

What it means:

If something makes your day, it makes you very happy. I also feel that you need an element of surprise for someting to make your day. It is not just happiness, it is unexpected happiness.

When to use it:

You can use this idiom whether it is something or someone that makes you happy.

Receiving a message from a friend, finally finding that top you have been looking for, finding a 5 euro note in one of your pockets or even realising a new episode of your favourite TV show is out are all things that could make your day.

Other interesting idioms in M:

  • Make ends meet – If it is hard to make ends meet, it is difficult to live with the money you earn.
  • Make someone’s blood boil – Something that makes your blood boil makes you angry.
  • More than one way to skin a cat –¬†This means that there is more than one way to achieve the same result.

Keep on learning!

Xoxo

And don’t forget to follow My Little English Page on¬†Facebook¬†,¬†Instagram¬†and YouTube¬†for regular updates.

Idiom in K – Keep at Bay

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And we continue this series of idioms with the letter -K-

What it means:

If you keep something, or someone, at bay it means that you are preventing them from coming too close, whether it is physically or metaphorically. (Also hold something at bay)

When to use it:

Let’s have a look at the physical aspect of it. If you keep someone at bay, you do what you can to keep them far from you. A typical example could be an overprotective dad keeping any of his daughter’s suitors at bay and scaring them (Who has a dad like that? Mine used to say that he would cut all my future boyfriends’ ears¬† and make them pointy like elves…Do not ask me why…You know, funny dads!)

But then I also mentioned a metaphorical aspect. By this, I am actually referring to abstract things such as sadness or hunger. I could for instance say that a nice cup of tea keeps the cold at bay in winter.

Other interesting idioms in K:

¬†Keep a straight face –¬†To stay serious and not to laugh despite wanting to.

Kick a habit – Stop doing something (that you are used to doing)

Knight in shining armour – A person who saves you when you are in great trouble

 

Keep on learning!

Xoxo

 

And don’t forget to follow My Little English Page on¬†Facebook¬†,¬†Instagram¬†and YouTube¬†for regular updates.

How I learnt English and My Tips

Happy New Year everyone!

A few of you have asked me how I learnt English so I thought I would make a video to tell you a little bit abut my background. I have also thrown a few tips to help you improve your English (those are all things I did!)

This is a listening exercise as well (like the usual) so I write the script and made a quiz you you:

How I learnt English

How I learnt English – Quiz

 

Watch the video and fill in the blanks in the quiz at the same time.

 

Don’t forget to follow My Little English Page on¬†Facebook¬†and¬†Instagram¬†for regular updates!